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College Recuiting Knowledgebase

The goal of education is the advancement of knowledge and the dissemination of truth.

John F Kennedy Jr.

College Recruiting Terminology

Contact

A contact occurs any time a coach has any face-to-face contact with you or your parents off the college's campus and says more than hello. A contact also occurs if a coach has any contact with you or your parents at your high school or any location where you are competing or practicing.with us and we can work with you to resolve it ASAP. 2016-17 NCAA Recruiting Calendars

Contact period

During this time, a college coach may have in person contact with you and/or your parents on or off the college's campus. The coach may also watch you play or visit your high school. You and your parents may visit a college campus and the coach may write and telephone you during this period.

Evaluation

An evaluation is an activity by a coach to evaluate your academic or athletics ability. This would include visiting your high school or watching you practice or compete.

Quiet period

During this time, a college coach may not have any in-person contact with you or your parents off the college's campus. The coach may not watch you play or visit your high school during this period. You and your parents may visit a college campus during this time. A coach may write or telephone you or your parents during this time.

Dead period

A college coach may not have any in-person contact with you or your parents on or off campus at any time during a dead period. The coach may write and telephone you or your parents during this time.

Unofficial visit

Any visit by you and your parents to a college campus paid for by you or your parents. The only expense you may receive from the college is three complimentary admissions to a home athletics contest. You may make as many unofficial visits as you like and may take those visits at any time. The only time you cannot talk with a coach during an unofficial visit is during a dead period.

Official visit

Any visit to a college campus by you and your parents paid for by the college. The college may pay all or some of the following expenses: • Your transportation to and from the college; • Room and meals (three per day) while you are visiting the college; and • Reasonable entertainment expenses, including three complimentary admissions to a home athletics contest. Before a DI college may invite you on an official visit, you will have to provide the college with a copy of your high school transcript and ACT, SAT or PLAN score and register with the NCAA Eligibility Center.

Prospective student-athlete

You become a “prospective student-athlete” when: • You start ninth-grade classes; • Before your ninth-grade year, a college gives you, your relatives or your friends any financial assistance or other benefits that the college does not provide to students generally.

Verbal commitment

This phrase is used to describe a college bound student-athlete's commitment to a school before he or she signs (or is able to sign) a National Letter of Intent. A college bound studentathlete can announce a verbal commitment at any time. While verbal commitments have become very popular for both college-bound student-athletes and coaches, this "commitment" is NOT binding on either the college-bound student-athlete or the college or university. Only the signing of the National Letter of Intent accompanied by a financial aid agreement is binding on both parties.

National Letter of Intent

The National Letter of Intent (NLI) is a voluntary program administered by the NCAA Eligibility Center. By signing an NLI, the college-bound student-athlete agrees to attend the college or university for one academic year. In exchange, that college or university must provide athletics financial aid for one academic year. Restrictions are contained in the NLI itself. Read them carefully. These restrictions may affect your eligibility. If you have questions about the NLI, visit the website or call 317-223-0706

NCAA Eligibility Center

Purpose

The purpose of the NCAA Eligibility Center is to certify prospective student-athletes’ athletics and amateurism eligibility for Divisions I and II.

Initial Eligibility vs. College Admission

NCAA initial eligibility is separate from college admissions. Each institution makes its own admissions decisions based on established admissions criteria. A prospective student-athlete may gain admission to an institution but not meet NCAA initial-eligibility standards or may meet initial-eligibility standards but not gain admission.

Who Should Register

An evaluation is an activity by a coach to evaluate your academic or athletics ability. This would include visiting your high school or watching you practice or compete.

Quiet period

High school students who intend to participate in Division I or II athletics as a freshman in college should register with the eligibility center. Transfer students who will be attending a Division I or II school for the first time must also register and receive amateurism certification.

When Should Students Register

There is no deadline to register with the eligibility center; however, the center recommends that students register after their junior year in high school. Students can register with the eligibility center by completing the on line registration form. Please note that students must be registered with and certified as eligible by the eligibility center to be eligible for an athletics scholarship, practice and intercollegiate competition their first year at a Division I or II institution.

Requirements for Initial-Eligibility Certification

Students must meet the following requirements in order to be certified by the clearinghouse: • Graduate from high school; • Successfully complete a core curriculum of at least 16 academic courses (beginning August 2008); and • Have a core-course grade-point average and combined score on the SAT verbal and math sections or a sum score on the ACT based on the initial-eligibility sliding scale.

Core Courses

To meet the core-course requirement, the course must be defined as a recognized academic course and qualify for high school graduation credit in one or a combination of the following areas: English, mathematics, natural/physical science, social science, foreign language, computer science or nondoctrinal religion. The course must be considered college preparatory by the high school. In addition, the course must be taught by a qualified instructor and at or above the high school’s regular academic level (i.e., remedial, special education or compensatory courses shall not be considered core courses). A list of approved core courses is available on line

ACT/SAT Test

In Divisions I and II, students must achieve the minimum required SAT or ACT score before their first fulltime college enrollment. Test scores must be achieved under national testing conditions on a national testing date. All prospective student-athletes, including natives of foreign countries, must achieve the minimum required test score on a national testing date. Please note that the ACT sum score is used, not the composite score. To obtain the sum score, add the four subscores together (English, math, science and reading). The same applies for the SAT. To obtain the sum score, add the verbal and math sections together. If the eligibility center has more than one ACT or SAT score for a student, the highest scores from each subtest (ACT: English, math, science and reading, SAT: verbal and math) will be used. Scores must be sent directly to the eligibility center from the Testing Agency. (Fill out code 9999 on your test form)

Athletic Aid Awards

General

Athletic scholarships are awarded by NCAA Divisions I and II colleges and universities. Division III colleges and universities do not award financial aid based on athletics ability, but you may be eligible to receive academic scholarships or need-based financial aid. It is important to understand several points about athletics scholarships

Does the NCAA award athletics scholarships?

No. Individual colleges and universities award athletics scholarships, not the NCAA. Divisions I and II schools offer athletics scholarships. Division III colleges and universities offer academic scholarships only. NCAA colleges and universities provide more than $1.5 billion in athletics scholarships annually.

Is an athletic scholarship guaranteed for four years?

At a minimum, an athletic scholarship must be a one academic year agreement. In Division I, colleges and universities are permitted to offer multi-year scholarships. Athletics scholarships may be renewed and the college or university must notify the student-athlete in writing by July 1 whether the athletics scholarship will be renewed for the next academic year. Individual colleges and universities have appeal policies for scholarships that are reduced or not renewed. In most cases, the coach decides who gets a scholarship, what it covers and whether it will be renewed.

What do athletics scholarships cover?

Divisions I and II athletics scholarships are awarded in a variety of amounts. Colleges and universities are permitted to provide a student-athlete with tuition and fees, room, board and required course-related books.

Can student-athletes receive other, non-athletics financial aid?

Yes. Thousands of student-athletes benefit from academic scholarships and need-based aid, such as federal Pell Grants. In addition, there is money available from the NCAA’s own Student-Athlete Opportunity Fund. Sometimes student athletes cannot accept certain types of aid because of NCAA amateurism or financial aid requirements. You must report all scholarships you receive to your college financial aid office. Student-athletes and parents with questions or additional financial aid should check with the athletics department of the college or university or the college or university’s financial aid office.